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  • Le management agile prend son envol en réponse à l'environnement turbulent, complexe et imprévisible. Ce contexte où les changements se succèdent à un rythme effréné, nécessite régulièrement des réactions rapides de la part des organisations.

  • "DevOps can indeed be a positive influence on ITIL, enabling improvements in various processes across the service lifecycle. A more collaborative DevOps approach adds value in service strategy, by ensuring that operations and development functions are included during the development of overall IT business strategy. A DevOps approach also adds value during service design, by ensuring that design coordination includes active participation from both operations and development—resulting in the potential for designing improved functionality and performance, as well as operational support. During service transition, a DevOps approach facilitates the effectiveness and efficiency of both change management, and the process of release and deployment management. By encouraging greater collaboration between development, operations, and indeed all IT functions, a DevOps approach can facilitate knowledge management as well. During service operation a DevOps approach can help ensure closer collaboration between the service desk and backline support and development teams—resulting in more effective incident and problem management. It also emphasizes the need for applying automation to change management as well as release and deployment management "models—thereby facilitating the frequency of deployments, more consistent delivery of new and changed releases, and improved quality. Continual service improvement (CSI) also benefits from a greater level communication and collaboration between development and operations teams, resulting in a higher level of teamwork, synergy, and creativity. The result is a greater likelihood of identifying improvement opportunities across the lifecycle, many of which will be turned into formal CSI improvement proposals - some of which will be approved and chartered for implementation. The result: higher performance, lower costs, and improved service quality."

  • This in-class development workshop deals with the data modeling technique (data or classes) and the basic technical concepts (formalism, integrity rules, partition criteria). It includes several exercises and discussion periods which support the learning of targeted competencies.

  • This in-class event covers concepts, formalisms, techniques and criteria to model the user and owner levels of the structure as well as the dynamics of an information system promoted by ProductivityCentre.
    Combined with discussions, theoretical exposés, examples and a case study, the event not only allows for the modeling concepts proposed by ProductivityCentre to be manipulated but also enables the modeling technique to be gradually and efficiently put into practice by harmonizing the structure and dynamics of systemic components.

  • Session 10: Testing in the Lab

    In this session of our conversation, Bridging The Gap Between Developers and Testers Using Visual Studio 2010, Etienne and Vincent deploy the web service to the lab environment and then run tests against it to ensure that everything is working.

  • Session 8: Let's Get Back on Track

    In this session of our conversation, Bridging The Gap Between Developers and Testers Using Visual Studio 2010, Vincent updates the code to fix the production bug. Once fixed, he shows us how he associates the changes with the bug and commits the changes. Etienne then creates and runs a test case to prove that the bug has been resolved. Vincent highlights an important point - the new feature that he added is not in the build that Etienne is testing. Why? Etienne is testing the build from the code in the branch that was created for the production release (Vincent's feature was not part of the production release). Etienne then merges the release branch with main branch to bring the bug fix in with the new features developed after the production release.

  • Session 7: Stop, We Have A Problem!

    In this session of our conversation, Bridging The Gap Between Developers and Testers Using Visual Studio 2010, Etienne and Vincent work through a situation that we are all very familiar with - a bug in production code! But how do we deal with defects in code after modifications have been made in support of new features? Branch the code. Etienne and Vincent explore the concept of branching and then show us how to branch code in a project.

  • Session 6: Bridging the Gap

    In this session of our conversation, Bridging The Gap Between Developers and Testers Using Visual Studio 2010, Etienne and Vincent show how the developer uses the information gathered by the tester within Visual
    Studio to resolve a bug. Vincent explores the test results and shows us the output of the recording taken when Etienne, as a tester, was running his test. Remember the IntelliTrace test setting that was enabled? Vincent looks at the results of that IntelliTrace and debugs the code to find the exact line of code that caused the application to crash. Once he makes the required updates to the code, he checks in the code and associates the code check-in with the bug filed by Etienne in the previous session. Last but not least, he updates the bug status, which lets Etienne know that he has a new bug to test.

    Etienne looks up the recommended tests for the particular bug and reruns the test to ensure that the bug is, in fact, fixed. The first time he runs through the test manually. The second time, he uses Test Runner's action
    playback capabilities to have Test Runner run through the test case, enter all the data, and capture the results, all on its own.

  • Session 5: Tester at Work

    In this session of our conversation, Bridging The Gap Between Developers and Testers Using Visual Studio 2010, Etienne and Vincent explore the many different facets of manual testing. First, they introduce us to the different types of tests that can be run with Test Manager and walkthrough creating a test case that runs against the application. Once the test case is designed, Etienne and Vincent show us how to run the test case, record the actions for each step as the test case is being executed, and then explore the results of the test and the information Test Runner captures. All of that information is then used to create a new bug that is then filed for the developers. Etienne also highlights different settings that can be enabled or disabled for each test, including video recording and IntelliTrace.

  • Session 4: Adding a Tester to the Team

    In this session of our conversation, Bridging The Gap Between Developers and Testers Using Visual Studio 2010, Etienne and Vincent talk about the differences between white-box and black-box testing of applications. They switch hats and put on their "tester" hats, introducing us to a new addition to Visual Studio - Test Manager. Etienne demonstrates how to create a new test plan and add test cases to it. But how do you add a test case? Don't worry, Etienne and Vincent cover that in the next session of our conversation.

  • Session 3: Where's our backlog?

    In this session of our conversation, Bridging The Gap Between Developers and Testers Using Visual Studio 2010, Etienne and Vincent show us the basics of a Scrum-based backlog and how to connect and migrate a backlog to Team Foundation Server from Excel. They also introduce us to DemoApp and the bug that's in the code. The bug will be worked on in later sessions of the conversation. During the Q&A session, Etienne also talks about and defines terms used in different methodologies, integration between Team Foundation Server and Project, and Team Foundation Server's API.

  • Session 13: Look Boss, No Hands!

    In this session of our conversation, Bridging The Gap Between Developers and Testers Using Visual Studio 2010, Etienne and Vincent look at automated functional testing by using assertions and the Coded UI Test Builder. Vincent records the actions he wants to tests, sets the conditions he wants to assert, the Coded UI Test Builders generates the test method, and then Vincent adds the test to the coded UI tests that he runs against the application.

  • Session 12: Validating UI Automation

    In this session of our conversation, Bridging The Gap Between Developers and Testers Using Visual Studio 2010, Etienne and Vincent look at automated functional testing by using assertions and the Coded UI Test Builder. Vincent records the actions he wants to tests, sets the conditions he wants to assert, the Coded UI Test Builders generates the test method, and then Vincent adds the test to the coded UI tests that he runs against the application.

  • Session 11: UI Automation

    In this session of our conversation, Bridging The Gap Between Developers and Testers Using Visual Studio 2010, Etienne and Vincent use a previously manually recorded test to created an automated coded UI test. Etienne also demonstrates a trick on how to setup environment variables with scripts to ensure that the test runs against the version of the application that matches the environment in which you're testing without the you having to go in and change the code.

  • Session 3: Where's our backlog?

    In this session of our conversation, Bridging The Gap Between Developers and Testers Using Visual Studio 2010, Etienne and Vincent show us the basics of a Scrum-based backlog and how to connect and migrate a backlog to Team Foundation Server from Excel. They also introduce us to DemoApp and the bug that's in the code. The bug will be worked on in later sessions of the conversation. During the Q&A session, Etienne also talks about and defines terms used in different methodologies, integration between Team Foundation Server and Project, and Team Foundation Server's API.

  • Session 1: Migrating VSS to TFS

    In this session of our conversation, Bridging The Gap Between Developers and Testers Using Visual Studio 2010, Etienne and Vincent give us a brief introduction to Team Foundation Server, it's tools, and how it integrates with the tools in your environment that you're already familiar with such as Visual Studio, Office, and SharePoint. They'll also show us how migration from an existing Visual SourceSafe repository to Team Foundation Server can be automated so that you don't have to migrate everything by hand.

  • Session 2: Automating the Build

    In this session of our conversation, Bridging The Gap Between Developers and Testers Using Visual Studio 2010, Etienne and Vincent talk to us about what is a build, types of builds you can configure in Team Foundation Server, and the advantages of each. They also walkthrough configuring a build, explaining each of the steps required in enabling automated unit tests, sharing of source and symbol files, and retention of builds. Once the build is done, they show us how to read the progress report and understand the information it displays.

  • Session 9: Multi-Environment Testing

    In this session of our conversation, Bridging The Gap Between Developers and Testers Using Visual Studio 2010, Etienne and Vincent introduce us to Lab Management, a new feature of Visual Studio that lets you manage a collection of virtual machines, templates, and virtual environments where you can develop, test, or run your application. Etienne demonstrates how to create a new lab environment and start it in order to test applications.

  • Fujitsu washable tag is highly durable and flexible UHF RFID tag.